The Last Superpower Summits will be presented on April 11 at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of The George Washington University.

House of a Thousand Floors  is a 2016 INDIES Finalist in the Science Fiction category. 

The latest release is Castle and Cathedral in Modern Prague (Longing for the sacred in a skeptical age). 

CEU Press participated in the Leipzig Book Fair, March 23-26.

The Stranger, the Tears, the Photograph, the Touch (Divine presence in Spain and Europe since 1500): a selection of pictures from this forthcoming book is on display in the Hungarian House of Photography – Mai Manó House until May 24.

How They Lived, volume 2 by András Koerner: book launch took place at the Center for Jewish History, New York on March 14, 2017, moderated by Frank Mecklenburg, Director of Research and Chief Archivist at Leo Baeck Institute.

Book launch and panel discussion of Twenty-five Sides of a Post-Communist Mafia State with Bálint Magyar, Júlia Vásárhelyi, András Bozóki, and Balázs Trencsényi was held on March 10, 2017 at the Budapest campus of the Central European University.

2017 Spring/Summer Catalog is available for download.

Roma-Gypsy Presence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, 15th-18th Centuries by Lech Mróz received honorable mention for the Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies.

On Holocaust Memorial Day CEU Press offered a selection of texts and photos from recent publications of the press.

Top five CEU Press titles by number of copies sold in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Post-Communist Mafia State
Arguing it Out
Hybrid Renaissance

Top five by sales revenue in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Art Beyond Borders
Nationalizing Empires
Holocaust in Hungary





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Whitehorn's Windmill

or the Unusual Events Once Upon a Time in the Land of Paudruvė

Kazys Boruta

Translated and with an Afterword by Elizabeth Novickas

Kazys Boruta, Lithuanian writer and poet (1905–1965)

Because of his political views, Kazys Boruta spent years in prison both before and after WWII. In the last phase of his life in Soviet Lithuania, he earned a living by translations published under a pseudonym.

Most of Whitehorn’s Windmill (Baltaragio malūnas) was written in 1942, during the German occupation. Bearing a lyrical style that gives full rein to the oral folktale tradition Lithuania is famous for, the novel is by turns romantic, farcical, fantastic, and tragic. The sense of spirituality that permeates the work reflects Lithuania’s pagan roots that were overlaid with an occasionally over-zealous Catholicism not so very long ago.

The story is about Whitehorn the miller’s efforts to find a match for his beautiful daughter, Jurga, against various calamities with and among suitors, neighbors, priests and other inhabitants of the village, and ultimately against the devil’s spell. The interesting plot made the novel popular as juvenile literature, too.


"Upon beginning Kazys Boruta’s novel, the reader will first be struck by the simple, informal prose and fairy-tale setting. But this mid-20th-century Lithuanian classic is anything but provincial.
It is in the depictions of Lithuanian folk tradition that the heart of Whitehorn’s Windmill lies, especially for an uninitiated English-language reader. The steadily paced fantastical elements, free of intrusive plot devices and didacticism, flow over the reader calmly, just as the current from Whitehorn’s windmill would if he or she were standing beside it. Towards the end of the novel, Boruta poses the question: “What sort of fairy tale is this then?” He isn’t claiming too much when he answers: “Why it’s life itself!”" - KGB Bar Lit Magazine


2010
284 pages
Paperback 978-963-9776-71-5 $17.95 T/ €13.95 / £11.99
Kindle

Published in the series:
CEU Press Classics
ISSN 1418-0162

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