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Practices of Coexistence
(Constructions of the other in early modern perceptions) was launched on 15th June at the Central European University in Budapest.

Utopian Horizons was launched on 30th May at CEU Budapest, more.

The Stranger, the Tears, the Photograph, the Touch (Divine presence in Spain and Europe since 1500): a selection of pictures from this book was on display in the Hungarian House of Photography – Mai Manó House until May 24.

The Last Superpower Summits is highly recommended by Choice. The book was presented on April 11 at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of The George Washington University.

House of a Thousand Floors  is a 2016 INDIES Finalist in the Science Fiction category. 

2017 Spring/Summer Catalog is available for download.

Roma-Gypsy Presence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, 15th-18th Centuries by Lech Mróz received honorable mention for the Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies.

Top five CEU Press titles by number of copies sold in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Post-Communist Mafia State
Arguing it Out
Hybrid Renaissance

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With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Art Beyond Borders
Nationalizing Empires
Holocaust in Hungary





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We, the People

Politics of National Peculiarity in Southeastern Europe

Edited by
Diana Mishkova, Centre for Advanced Study, Sofia, Bulgaria

Analyzes the processes of nation-building in nineteenth and early-twentieth-century south-eastern Europe. A product of transnational comparative teamwork, this collection represents a coordinated interpretation based on ten varied academic cultures and traditions.

The originality of the approach lies in a combination of three factors: [a] seeing nation-building as a process that is to a large extent driven by intellectuals and writers, rather than just a side effect of infrastructural modernization processes; [b] looking at the regional, cross-border ramifications of these processes (rather than in a rigid single-country-by-country perspective) and [c] looking at the autonomous role of intellectuals in these areas, rather than just seeing south-eastern Europe as an appendix to Europe-at-large, passively undergoing European influences.

The essays explore the political instrumentalization of the concepts of folk, people and ethnos in south-eastern Europe in the “long 19th century” by mapping the discursive and institutional itineraries through which this set of notions became a focal point of cultural and political thought in various national contexts; a process that coincided with the emergence of political modernity.


"In the history of emerging national awareness in Europe, the formerly Ottoman- and Habsburg-ruled regions in the continent’s South-East present a case of unusual complexity and interest. South-East Europe combines geopolitical regional cohesion and ethno-linguistic diversity, and witnessed the emergence of a complex cluster of both early and tardy nation-building movements in close proximity and overlap, antagonism and exchange. Hitherto largely underresearched (owing to political conditions and ingrained preconceptions), this south-eastern microcosm of Europe now takes its proper place in the panorama of European intellectual history thanks to this excellent volume. We, the People is a landmark book. It applies the latest theoretical insights and comparatist approaches to a wealth of relevant and fascinating case studies, which, besides their intrinsic importance, are now made available for comparative European and macro-regional historical research."
Prof. dr J. Th. Leerssen, Chair of Modern European Literature, University of Amsterdam


Contents

 Introduction; Part I. Ethnos and Citizens: Versions of Cultural-Political Construction of Identity Alexander Vezenkov, Reconciliation of the Spirits and Fusion of the Interests: “Ottomanism” as an Identity Politics; Kinga-Koretta Sata, The People Incorporated: Constructions of the Nation in Transylvanian Romanian Liberalism, 1838-1848; Tchavdar Marinov, “We, the Macedonians”: The Paths of Macedonian Supra-Nationalism (1878-1912); Balázs Trencsényi , History and Character: Visions of National Peculiarity in the Romanian Political Discourse of the Nineteenth Century; Part II. Nationalization of Sciences and the Definitions of the Folk Dessislava Lilova, Barbarians, Civilized People and Bulgarians: Definition of Identity in Textbooks and the Press (1830-1878); Levente Szabó, Narrating ’the People’ and ’Disciplining’ the Folk: the Constitution of the Hungarian Ethnographic Discipline and the Touristic Movements (1870-1900); Stefan Detchev , Who are the Bulgarians? “Race”, Science and Politics in Fin-de-Siècle Bulgaria ; Călin Cotoi, Imagining of National Spaces in Interwar Romania. The Emergence of Geopolitics; Part III. The Canon-Builders Bojan Aleksov, Jovan Jovanović Zmaj and the Serbian Identity between Poetry and History; Artan Puto, “Ottoman” or “Western”: Two Version of Albanianness at the turn of the 19th century; Bülent Bilmez, A Contested Nation-Builder: Þemseddin Sami Frashëri (1850-1904) and the Construction of Albanian and Turkish Nations; Notes on the Contributors; Index

2009
392 pages
ISBN 978-963-9776-28-9 cloth $55.00 / €50.00 / £45.00

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