The Last Superpower Summits will be presented on April 11 at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of The George Washington University.

House of a Thousand Floors  is a 2016 INDIES Finalist in the Science Fiction category. 

The latest release is Castle and Cathedral in Modern Prague (Longing for the sacred in a skeptical age). 

CEU Press participated in the Leipzig Book Fair, March 23-26.

The Stranger, the Tears, the Photograph, the Touch (Divine presence in Spain and Europe since 1500): a selection of pictures from this forthcoming book is on display in the Hungarian House of Photography – Mai Manó House until May 24.

How They Lived, volume 2 by András Koerner: book launch took place at the Center for Jewish History, New York on March 14, 2017, moderated by Frank Mecklenburg, Director of Research and Chief Archivist at Leo Baeck Institute.

Book launch and panel discussion of Twenty-five Sides of a Post-Communist Mafia State with Bálint Magyar, Júlia Vásárhelyi, András Bozóki, and Balázs Trencsényi was held on March 10, 2017 at the Budapest campus of the Central European University.

2017 Spring/Summer Catalog is available for download.

Roma-Gypsy Presence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, 15th-18th Centuries by Lech Mróz received honorable mention for the Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies.

On Holocaust Memorial Day CEU Press offered a selection of texts and photos from recent publications of the press.

Top five CEU Press titles by number of copies sold in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Post-Communist Mafia State
Arguing it Out
Hybrid Renaissance

Top five by sales revenue in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Art Beyond Borders
Nationalizing Empires
Holocaust in Hungary





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Published by Helena History Press, Saint Helena, CA, USA, distributed by CEU Press

Stigmatized

A history of the internal deportations in Hungary: 1951-1958

 

By Kinga Széchenyi

 

This volume provides a detailed history of the internal deportation campaign instituted by the Hungarian communist government in 1950s as a form of punishment for citizens considered “enemies of the state”. Their wealth, possessions, their way of life and most importantly, their influence on society at large had to be demolished.

The deportation campaign targeted remnants of qualified upper middle class: educators, medical or scientific professionals, aristocratic or military officials who represented pre-war Hungary and also well-to-do “kulaks” (peasants).

Széchenyi recounts the legal basis of the deportations, and points out the manner in which Hungarian laws were distorted to serve the purpose of sending its own citizens into forced internal exile. She has also uncovered many documents related to the deportations, their administration and implementation that are invaluable to our understanding of what amounted to a social engineering campaign by Hungary’s communist leaders to rid the country of elements they deemed undesirable.

In the second half of the volume, survivors recount their own personal memories of how deportations affected them and their families.

Stigmatized is the first book in English which lays out not only the history of the Hungarian internal deportations of the Stalinist era, but illustrates its consequences to a nation and society in the long run.

730 pages, 2016

978-0-9859433-7-0 cloth $55.00 / €42.00 / £35.00

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