The latest release is Subversive Stages (Theater in pre- and post-communist Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria).

The Last Superpower Summits was presented on April 11 at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of The George Washington University.

House of a Thousand Floors  is a 2016 INDIES Finalist in the Science Fiction category.   

The Stranger, the Tears, the Photograph, the Touch (Divine presence in Spain and Europe since 1500): a selection of pictures from this forthcoming book is on display in the Hungarian House of Photography – Mai Manó House until May 24.

How They Lived, volume 2 by András Koerner: book launch took place at the Center for Jewish History, New York on March 14, 2017, moderated by Frank Mecklenburg, Director of Research and Chief Archivist at Leo Baeck Institute.

Book launch and panel discussion of Twenty-five Sides of a Post-Communist Mafia State with Bálint Magyar, Júlia Vásárhelyi, András Bozóki, and Balázs Trencsényi was held on March 10, 2017 at the Budapest campus of the Central European University.

2017 Spring/Summer Catalog is available for download.

Roma-Gypsy Presence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, 15th-18th Centuries by Lech Mróz received honorable mention for the Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies.

On Holocaust Memorial Day CEU Press offered a selection of texts and photos from recent publications of the press.

Top five CEU Press titles by number of copies sold in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Post-Communist Mafia State
Arguing it Out
Hybrid Renaissance

Top five by sales revenue in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Art Beyond Borders
Nationalizing Empires
Holocaust in Hungary





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Polish Liberal Thought before 1918

Maciej Janowski, Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Sciences

"...provides a close reading of the views of individuals little known in the Anglophone world, but who created a distinctively Polish version of liberalism in the 19th century. Without the economic liberalism reflected in western thought, Janowski reveals Polish liberalism to be coherent and dynamic, emphasizing modernization in an effort to enable the Polish lands to 'catch up,' and consequently reflecting a more positive view of the state than the position taken by, for example, English liberals... Recommended. All levels/libraries." - Choice


Based on solid research, this erudite study is a first attempt at presenting a comprehensive analysis of nineteenth-century Polish liberalism. Polish liberal tradition has generally been considered weak or even nonexistent. Janowski, on the other hand, argues that nineteenth-century Poland inherited a strong protoliberal tradition from the nobility-based democracy, and that in the mid-nineteenth century, liberalism was a dominant trend in Polish intellectual life, even if it rarely appeared in its pure form and did not create political movements separating liberal aims from patriotic ones.

The author maintains that the definition of liberalism in Central Europe should not be based on the Anglo-Saxon model, in view of the weakness of the middle classes and, in the case of partitioned Poland, the lack of independent statehood. This explains why there was a marked etatist trend among liberal thinkers, who saw the creation of a strong state as a tool of modernization.

Janowski sees his subject in a broad comparative perspective, taking into account the historical experience of other nations of Central Europe. His innovative interpretation may be the starting point for new debates in the ongoing discussion on the different perceptions of liberalism.

2004
294 pages
ISBN 978-963-9241-18-3 cloth $47.95 / €42.95 / 40.00

 

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