The latest release is Castle and Cathedral in Modern Prague (Longing for the sacred in a skeptical age). 

CEU Press participates in the Leipzig Book Fair, March 23-26.

The Stranger, the Tears, the Photograph, the Touch (Divine presence in Spain and Europe since 1500): a selection of pictures from this forthcoming book is going to be displayed in the Hungarian House of Photography – Mai Manó House from March 23.

How They Lived, volume 2 by András Koerner: book launch took place at the Center for Jewish History, New York on March 14, 2017, moderated by Frank Mecklenburg, Director of Research and Chief Archivist at Leo Baeck Institute.

Book launch and panel discussion of Twenty-five Sides of a Post-Communist Mafia State with Bálint Magyar, Júlia Vásárhelyi, András Bozóki, and Balázs Trencsényi was held on March 10, 2017 at the Budapest campus of the Central European University.

2017 Spring/Summer Catalog is available for download.

Roma-Gypsy Presence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, 15th-18th Centuries by Lech Mróz received honorable mention for the Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies.

On Holocaust Memorial Day CEU Press offered a selection of texts and photos from recent publications of the press.

Top five CEU Press titles by number of copies sold in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Post-Communist Mafia State
Arguing it Out
Hybrid Renaissance

Top five by sales revenue in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Art Beyond Borders
Nationalizing Empires
Holocaust in Hungary





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HYBRID RENAISSANCE

Culture, Language, Architecture

 

 


Peter Burke
Emmanuel College, Cambridge

Hybrid Renaissance introduces the idea that the Renaissance in Italy, elsewhere in Europe, and in the world beyond Europe is an example of cultural hybridization.

The two key concepts used in this book are “hybridization” and “Renaissance”. Roughly speaking, hybridity refers to something new that emerges from the combination of diverse older elements. (The term “hybridization” is preferable to “hybridity” because it refers to a process rather than to a state, and also because it encourages the writer and the readers alike to think in terms of degree: where there is more or less, rather than presence versus absence.)

The book begins with a discussion of the concept of cultural hybridization and a cluster of other concepts related to it. Then comes a geography of cultural hybridization focusing on three locales: courts, major cities (whether ports or capitals) and frontiers. The following seven chapters describe the hybridity of the Renaissance in different fields: architecture, painting and sculpture, languages, literature, music, philosophy and law and finally religion. The essay concludes with a brief account of attempts to resist hybridization or to purify cultures or domains from what was already hybridized.

Table of Contents
List of Illustrations; Preface and Acknowledgements; Introduction: An Expanding Renaissance; Chapter 1. The Idea of Hybridity; Chapter 2. The Geography of Hybridity; Chapter 3. Translating Architecture; Chapter 4. Hybrid Arts; Chapter 5. Hybrid Languages; Chapter 6. Hybrid Literatures; Chapter 7. Music, Law and humanism; Chapter 8. Hybrid Philosophies; Chapter 9. Translating Gods; Coda. Counter-Hybridization; Notes; Bibliography; Index

284 pages with black-and-white illustrations, paperback, 2016

978- 963-386-087-8

130 x 200mm (5.1”x7.9”)

$24.95 / €19.00 / £16.00

Natalie Zemon Davis Annual Lecture Series


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