Come and celebrate with us 25 years of Medieval Studies at CEU!
Wide selection of books with 25% discount, including The Oldest Legend
When: today, March 23, from 2pm
Where: CEU Nador 13 Atrium

The Invisible Shining - book launch at Trinity College Dublin
15 February, 6-8pm more
We offer a 20% discount until March 15 if you order the book online through NBNi.
Please use the discount code: ABL2018

The 2018 Spring/Summer catalog is available for download.

Latest releases:

Academic Freedom. The Global Challenge
edited by Michael Ignatieff and Stefan Roch

From Central Planning to the Market by Libor Žídek

Coming soon:

Landscapes of Disease - Malaria in Modern Greece
Katerina Gardikas

Nationalism and Terror - Ante Pavelić and Ustasha Terrorism from Fascism to the Cold War
Pino Adriano and Giorgio Cingolani





Search the full text of our books:


 

Friendship and Love, Ethics and Politics
Studies in Mediaeval and Early Modern History

The Natalie Zemon Davis Annual Lecture Series, vol. 3.

Eva Österberg, Lund University, Sweden

Today, friendship, love and sexuality are mostly viewed as private, personal and informal relations. In the mediaeval and early modern period, just like in ancient times, this was different. The classical philosophy of friendship (Aristotle) included both friendship and love in the concept of philia. It was also linked to an argument about the virtues needed to become an excellent member of the city state. Thus, close relations were not only thought to be a matter of pleasant gatherings in privacy, but just as much a matter of ethics and politics.

What, then, happened to the classical ideas of close relations when they were transmitted to philosophers, clerical and monastic thinkers, state officials or other people in the medieval and early modern period? To what extent did friendship transcend the distinctions between private and public that then existed? How were close relations shaped in practice? Did dialogues with close friends help to contribute to the process of subject-formation in the Renaissance and Enlightenment? To what degree did institutions of power or individual thinkers find it necessary to caution against friendship or love and sexuality?

These are some of the questions raised in the book, on the basis of different European sources. The discussions touch upon changes in the distinctions between private and public, in subject-formation and legal practices, as well as the varying cultural, existential and ethical importance of close relations in history.

Each year one scholar of world fame is invited to present lectures in the framework of the Natalie Zemon Davis Annual Lecture Series at the Central European University, Budapest. This is the third volume in the series of published lectures.

"When a scholar paints with such a broad brush as Österberg has done, it is inevitable that people will disagree on some of the smaller points. Overall, however, she makes her case well: ideas about friendship, love and sexuality are integral to society as a whole, they change over time, they are complex at any given time, and the most prominent of the chronological stories that can be traced is the emplacement of a distinct boundary between friendship and love. She concludes with an eloquent call to bring to bear the history of friendship on contemporary ideas about it. The nature of the book as lectures makes it a very quick and pleasurable read."—The Medieval Review

Contents

Preface; Chapter 1. Friendship, Love, and Sexuality in Premodern Times. Themes and problems; Chapter 2. Challenging the Private–Public Dichotomy. Friendship in mediaeval and early modern society; Chapter 3. Me and My Friends. Individuality, friendship, and autobiography from Augustine to Rousseau; Chapter 4. Sexuality, Love, and Gender. The politics of heteronormativity in Reformation Sweden; Chapter 5. Close Relationships—then and now; Index

2010
236 pages
130x200 mm (5.1" x 7.9")
ISSN 1996-1197 The Natalie Zemon Davis Annual Lecture Series Vol.3
ISBN 978-963-9776-60-9 paperback $22.95 / €17.50 / £15.99

Other volumes in the Natalie Zemon Davis Annual Lecture Series:

Vol.1.Measuring Time, Making History
Vol.2.Emotion and Devotion - The Meaning of Mary in Medieval Religious Cultures
Vol.4 Emotions in History Lost and Found
Vol.5.Divine Presence in Spain and Western Europe 1500-1960 - Visions, Religious Images and Photographs

 

top