Practices of Coexistence
(Constructions of the other in early modern perceptions) was launched on 15th June at the Central European University in Budapest.

Utopian Horizons was launched on 30th May at CEU Budapest, more.

The Stranger, the Tears, the Photograph, the Touch (Divine presence in Spain and Europe since 1500): a selection of pictures from this book was on display in the Hungarian House of Photography – Mai Manó House until May 24.

The Last Superpower Summits is highly recommended by Choice. The book was presented on April 11 at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of The George Washington University.

House of a Thousand Floors  is a 2016 Foreword INDIES Finalist in the Science Fiction category. 

2017 Spring/Summer Catalog is available for download.

Roma-Gypsy Presence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, 15th-18th Centuries by Lech Mróz received honorable mention for the Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies.

Top five CEU Press titles by number of copies sold in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Post-Communist Mafia State
Arguing it Out
Hybrid Renaissance

Top five by sales revenue in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Art Beyond Borders
Nationalizing Empires
Holocaust in Hungary





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Coca-Cola Socialism
Americanization of Yugoslav Culture in the Sixties

Radina Vučetić

Radina Vučetić, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Department of History, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade

This book is about the Americanization of Yugoslav culture and everyday life during the nineteen-sixties. After falling out with the Eastern bloc, Tito turned to the United States for support and inspiration. In the political sphere the distance between the two countries was carefully maintained, yet in the realms of culture and consumption the Yugoslav regime was definitely much more receptive to the American model. For Titoist Yugoslavia this tactic turned out to be beneficial, stabilising the regime internally and providing an image of openness in foreign policy.
Coca-Cola Socialism addresses the link between cultural diplomacy, culture, consumer society and politics. Its main argument is that both culture and everyday life modelled on the American way were a major source of legitimacy for the Yugoslav Communist Party, and a powerful weapon for both USA and Yugoslavia in the Cold War battle for hearts and minds. Radina Vučetić explores how the Party used American culture in order to promote its own values and what life in this socialist and capitalist hybrid system looked like for ordinary people who lived in a country with communist ideology in a capitalist wrapping. Her book offers a careful reevaluation of the limits of appropriating the American dream and questions both an uncritical celebration of Yugoslavia’s openness and an exaggerated depiction of its authoritarianism.

 

310 pages, and 15 pages photo gallery
978-963-386-200-1 cloth
$65.00 / €58.00 / £50.00


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