Come and celebrate with us 25 years of Medieval Studies at CEU!
Wide selection of books with 25% discount, including The Oldest Legend
When: today, March 23, from 2pm
Where: CEU Nador 13 Atrium

The Invisible Shining - book launch at Trinity College Dublin
15 February, 6-8pm more
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Latest releases:

Academic Freedom. The Global Challenge
edited by Michael Ignatieff and Stefan Roch

From Central Planning to the Market by Libor Žídek

Coming soon:

Landscapes of Disease - Malaria in Modern Greece
Katerina Gardikas

Nationalism and Terror - Ante Pavelić and Ustasha Terrorism from Fascism to the Cold War
Pino Adriano and Giorgio Cingolani





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Coca-Cola Socialism
Americanization of Yugoslav Culture in the Sixties

Radina Vučetić

Radina Vučetić, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Department of History, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade

This book is about the Americanization of Yugoslav culture and everyday life during the nineteen-sixties. After falling out with the Eastern bloc, Tito turned to the United States for support and inspiration. In the political sphere the distance between the two countries was carefully maintained, yet in the realms of culture and consumption the Yugoslav regime was definitely much more receptive to the American model. For Titoist Yugoslavia this tactic turned out to be beneficial, stabilising the regime internally and providing an image of openness in foreign policy.
Coca-Cola Socialism addresses the link between cultural diplomacy, culture, consumer society and politics. Its main argument is that both culture and everyday life modelled on the American way were a major source of legitimacy for the Yugoslav Communist Party, and a powerful weapon for both USA and Yugoslavia in the Cold War battle for hearts and minds. Radina Vučetić explores how the Party used American culture in order to promote its own values and what life in this socialist and capitalist hybrid system looked like for ordinary people who lived in a country with communist ideology in a capitalist wrapping. Her book offers a careful reevaluation of the limits of appropriating the American dream and questions both an uncritical celebration of Yugoslavia’s openness and an exaggerated depiction of its authoritarianism.

 

310 pages, and 15 pages photo gallery
978-963-386-200-1 cloth
$65.00 / €58.00 / £50.00


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