The latest release is Subversive Stages (Theater in pre- and post-communist Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria).

The Last Superpower Summits was presented on April 11 at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of The George Washington University.

House of a Thousand Floors  is a 2016 INDIES Finalist in the Science Fiction category.   

The Stranger, the Tears, the Photograph, the Touch (Divine presence in Spain and Europe since 1500): a selection of pictures from this forthcoming book is on display in the Hungarian House of Photography – Mai Manó House until May 24.

How They Lived, volume 2 by András Koerner: book launch took place at the Center for Jewish History, New York on March 14, 2017, moderated by Frank Mecklenburg, Director of Research and Chief Archivist at Leo Baeck Institute.

Book launch and panel discussion of Twenty-five Sides of a Post-Communist Mafia State with Bálint Magyar, Júlia Vásárhelyi, András Bozóki, and Balázs Trencsényi was held on March 10, 2017 at the Budapest campus of the Central European University.

2017 Spring/Summer Catalog is available for download.

Roma-Gypsy Presence in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, 15th-18th Centuries by Lech Mróz received honorable mention for the Kulczycki Book Prize in Polish Studies.

On Holocaust Memorial Day CEU Press offered a selection of texts and photos from recent publications of the press.

Top five CEU Press titles by number of copies sold in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Post-Communist Mafia State
Arguing it Out
Hybrid Renaissance

Top five by sales revenue in 2016:
With Their Backs to the Mountains
How They Lived
Art Beyond Borders
Nationalizing Empires
Holocaust in Hungary





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BUREK
A Culinary Metaphor

Jernej Mlekuž, Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Ljubljana

“As simple as burek” is a popular phrase used by many young people in Slovenia. In this book Jernej Mlekuž maintains that the truth is just the opposite. The burek is a pie made of pastry dough filled with various fillings that is well-known in the Balkans, and also in Turkey and the Near East by other names. Whether on the plate or as a cultural artifact, it is in fact, not that simple. After a brief stroll through its innocent history, Mlekuž focuses on the present state of the burek, after parasitical ideologies had attached themselves to it and poisoned its discourses. In Slovenia, the burek has become a loaded metaphor for the Balkans and immigrants from the republics of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Without the burek it would be equally difficult to consider the jargon of Slovenian youth, the imagined world of Slovenian chauvinism and the rhetorical arsenal of advertising agents when promoting healthy foods.

In this analysis, Mlekuž refers to the burek as the “metaburek.” All at the same time it is greasy, Balkan, Slovene, not-Slovene, Yugoslavian, familiar, foreign, the greatest, the worst, disturbingly unhealthy, plebeian, junk food, and finally, a cherub (burek spelled backwards is kerub, the Slovene word for cherub). And this metaburek, the protagonist of this book, is never a completely pure, innocent, unconditioned burek. It is much more.

A word of warning: after consuming this text, the burek will never be the same.
The Preburek and a burek recipe is available here.

183 pages, 13 photos and 7 recipes, 2015

978-963-386-089-2 cloth

$45.00 / €34.00 / £29.00

978-963-386-090-8 paperback

$22.95 / €17.50 / £14.99

 

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